Quality Standards: Acute care equipment and drug lists (2023)

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Resuscitation Council UK

originally published November 2013. Last updated May 2020.

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Introduction

Healthcare organisations have an obligation to provide a high-quality resuscitation service, and to ensure that staff are trained and updated regularly to a level of proficiency appropriate to each individual’s expected role.

As part of the quality standards for cardiopulmonary resuscitation practice and training this document provides lists of the minimum equipment and drugs required for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. These lists are categorised according to the clinical setting.

The equipment and drug lists on this page are in reference to the Acute Care Quality Standards.

The core standards for the provision of cardiopulmonary resuscitation across all healthcare settings are described in the Introduction and Overview to Quality Standards.

Drug tables for cardiac arrest are highlighted in the text with the symbol !

(Video) Emergency Drugs and Equipment | Crash Cart

General points

  1. All clinical service providers must ensure that their staff have immediate access to appropriate resuscitation equipment and drugs to facilitate rapid resuscitation of the patient in cardiorespiratory arrest. The standard defibrillator sign should be used in order to reduce delay in locating a defibrillator in an emergency. The sign can be downloaded here.
  2. All settings must have a means of calling for help (e.g. landline telephone [internal or external], mobile telephone with reliable signal, or alarm bell).
  3. Standardisation of the equipment used for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (including defibrillators and emergency suction equipment), and the layout of equipment and drugs throughout an organisation is recommended.
  4. It is recognised that planning for every eventuality is complex; therefore, organisations must undertake a risk assessment to determine what resources are required given their local circumstances. Risk factors to consider include patient group (e.g. adults, children), incidence of cardiac arrest, training of staff, and access to expert help.
    • a. For example, in secondary or tertiary care specific locations may need special provisions (e.g. for failed intubation, tracheostomy care, cardiac arrest in pregnancy etc).
    • b. Some settings need a wide range of equipment immediately available (e.g. resuscitation room in emergency department). Suggested options include having basic equipment (and possibly drugs) available immediately (on a resuscitation trolley), and further equipment and drugs arriving with a resuscitation team (in a ‘grab-bag’), or in some settings as part of an ambulance response.
    • c. Staff should be trained to use the available equipment according to their expected roles.
  5. Depending on the organisation, this risk assessment must be overseen by a Resuscitation Committee or a designated resuscitation lead. Expert advice should also be sought locally from those commonly involved in resuscitation (e.g. resuscitation officers, emergency physicians, cardiac care unit staff, intensivists, anaesthetists, prehospital care physicians).
  6. Resuscitation equipment should be single-patient-use and latex-free, whenever possible and appropriate. Where non-disposable equipment is used, a clear policy for decontamination after each use must be available and must be followed.
  7. Personal protective equipment (e.g. gloves, aprons, eye protection) and sharps boxes must be available, based on a local risk assessment and local polices.
  8. A reliable system of equipment checks and replacement must be in place to ensure that equipment and drugs are always available for use in a cardiac arrest. The frequency of checks should be determined locally.
  9. It is recommended that equipment and drugs are presented in a clear and logical manner to enable easier use during an emergency.
  10. The manufacturer’s instructions must be followed regarding use, storage, servicing and expiry of equipment and drugs.
  11. Further equipment and drugs may be needed to manage other types of emergencies that are likely to be encountered in a particular setting; this may include:
    • monitoring equipment (e.g. blood pressure, pulse oximetry, 3-lead electrocardiogram [ECG], temperature, waveform capnography),
    • 12-lead ECG recorder,
    • difficult airway equipment (e.g. scalpel and bougie for cricothyroidotomy),
    • near-patient tests (e.g. blood glucose, blood gas analysis).
  12. A formal procurement process that includes trialling of equipment before purchase is recommended. Trialling of resuscitation equipment can take place in actual care settings or in simulated clinical scenarios.
  13. The precise availability of equipment and drugs should be determined locally. The equipment lists include a suggestion on the immediacy with which equipment and drugs should be available:
    • a. Immediate - available for use within the first minutes of cardiorespiratory arrest (i.e. at the start of resuscitation).
    • b. Accessible - available for prompt use when the need is determined by resuscitation team.
  14. These lists are not exhaustive. Local experts should be consulted to ensure that the appropriate equipment and drugs are available when they are needed, to enable provision of high-quality attempted resuscitation.

Equipment and drug lists: adult

The equipment and drug lists in this chapter are for adult acute hospital care.

Drug tables for cardiac arrest are highlighted in the text with the symbol !

Airway and Breathing (Adult)

Acute Hospital Care - Adult

Airway and breathing

ItemSuggested AvailabilityComments
Pocket mask with oxygen portImmediateAccording to local policy
Oxygen mask with reservoirImmediate
Self-inflating bag with reservoirImmediate
Clear face masks, sizes 3, 4, 5Immediate
Oropharyngeal airways, sizes 2, 3, 4Immediate
Nasopharyngeal airways, sizes 6, 7 (and lubrication)Immediate
Portable suction (battery or manual) with Yankauer sucker and soft suction cathetersImmediateAirway suction equipment. NPSA Signal. Reference number 1309. February 2011
Supraglottic airway device with syringes, lubrication and ties/tapes/scissors as appropriateImmediate/AccessibleChoice of device (e.g. laryngeal mask airway, i-gel®, laryngeal tube) and size will depend on local policy and staff training
Oxygen cylinder (with key where necessary)Immediate
Oxygen tubingImmediate
Magill forcepsImmediate
StethoscopeImmediate
Tracheal tubes, cuffed, sizes 6, 7, 8Immediate/AccessibleThis will depend on local policy and staff training. For example, there is not consensus on the role of a ‘stylet’
Tracheal tube introducer (stylet)Immediate/AccessibleThis will depend on local policy and staff training. For example, there is not consensus on the role of a ‘stylet’

Laryngoscope handles (x 2) and blades (size 3 and 4)

Spare batteries for laryngoscope and spare bulbs (if applicable)

Immediate/AccessibleThis will depend on local policy and staff training. For example, there is not consensus on the role of a ‘stylet’
Syringes, lubrication and ties/tapes/scissors for tracheal tubeImmediate/Accessible

This will depend on local policy and staff training. For example, there is not consensus on the role of a ‘stylet’

Waveform capnograph - with appropriate tubing and connectorImmediate/Accessible

For use with supraglottic airways or tracheal tube. NAP4 - 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Difficult Airway Society, March 2011.

Standards of monitoring during anaesthesia and recovery. Association of Anaesthetist of Great Britain and Ireland, 2011.

EBA Recommendation for the use of Capnography. European Board of Anaesthesiology, 2011.

Circulation (Adult)

(Video) Advisor Live Webinar: USP 800 Hazardous Drugs: Overview and the Road to Readiness

Acute Hospital Care - Adult

Circulation

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Defibrillator
Manual and/or automated external defibrillator
Pacing function if needed
ImmediateType of defibrillator, and locations determined by a local risk assessment. Available to enable shock within 3 minutes of collapse. Pacing function is recommended for cardiac units, cardiac catheter laboratories, emergency departments, intensive care units and operating theatres. It may also be appropriate for other settings, and this should be determined locally
Adhesive defibrillator padsImmediateSpare set of pads also recommended. Pads should be suitable for external pacing if needed
RazorImmediate
ECG electrodesImmediate
Intravenous cannulae (selection of sizes) and 2% chlorhexidine/alcohol wipes, tourniquets and cannula dressingsImmediate/Accessible
Adhesive tapeImmediate/Accessible
Intravenous infusion setImmediate/Accessible
0.9% sodium chloride (1000 ml)Immediate/AccessibleAmount depends on availability of further supplies
Selection of needles and syringesImmediate/Accessible
Intra-osseous access deviceAccessible
Central venous access - Seldinger kit, full barrier precautions (hat, mask, sterile gloves, gown) and skin preparation (2% chlorhexidine / alcohol)AccessiblePlaced with ultrasound guidance, where possible
Ultrasound / echocardiographyAccessibleTo identify and treat reversible causes of cardiorespiratory arrest

Other Items (Adult)

Acute Hospital Care - Adult

Other items

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Clock/timerAccessible
Gloves, aprons, eye protectionImmediateFurther personal protective equipment may be required according to local policy
Nasogastric tubeAccessible
Sharps container and clinical waste bagImmediateSharps container must be immediately available wherever sharps used
Large scissorsAccessible
2% chlorhexidine / alcohol wipesAccessible
Blood sample tubesAccessible
IV extension setAccessibleTypes of connectors, ports, and caps to be determined locally
Pressure bags for infusionAccessible
Blood gas syringeAccessible
Blood glucose analyser with appropriate stripsImmediate/AccessibleAccording to local policy
Drug labelsAccessibleGuidance on colour coding for syringe labels
Manual handling equipmentAccessibleAccording to setting.
See Guidance for safer handling during resuscitation in healthcare settings
Cardiorespiratory arrest record forms for patient records, audit forms and DNACPR formsAccessible
Access to algorithms, emergency drug dosesAccessible

CARDIAC ARREST DRUGS - FIRST LINE for intravenous use ! (Adult)

Acute Hospital Care - Adult

CARDIAC ARREST DRUGS - FIRST LINE for intravenous use !

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Adrenaline 1mg (= 10 ml 1:10,000) as a prefilled syringe x 3ImmediateNumber of syringes depends on access to further syringes. 1mg needed for each 4-5 min of CPR
Amiodarone 300mg as a prefilled syringe x 1AccessibleFirst dose required after 3 defibrillation attempts

CARDIAC ARREST & PERI-ARREST DRUGS for intravenous use ! (Adult)

Acute Hospital Care - Adult

CARDIAC ARREST & PERI-ARREST DRUGS for intravenous use !

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Adenosine 6 mg x 5Accessible
Atropine - 1mg x 3Accessible
Adrenaline 1mg (= 10 ml 1:10,000) prefilled syringeAccessibleFurther syringes should be accessible for prolonged resuscitation attempts
Amiodarone 300mg x 1AccessibleIf decision is made to give further doses of amiodarone
Calcium chloride 10 ml 10% x 1AccessibleCalcium gluconate can be used as an alternative. Note:
10 ml 10% Calcium chloride =
6.8 mmol Ca2+
10 ml 10% Calcium gluconate = 2.26 mmol Ca2+
Chlorphenamine 10 mg x 2AccessibleSecond-line treatment for anaphylaxis, can also be given intramuscularly
Hydrocortisone 100 mg x 2AccessibleSecond-line treatment for anaphylaxis, can also be given intramuscularly
Glucose for intravenous useImmediate/AccessibleVolume and concentration according to local policy
20% lipid emulsion 500 mlAccessibleFor use in areas where large doses of local anaesthetic are used for regional blocks, according to Association of Anaesthetists Guidelines.
Lidocaine 100 mg x 1AccessibleInclusion to be determined locally
Magnesium sulphate (2 g = 8 mmol) x 1Accessible
Midazolam 5 mg in 5 ml x 1AccessibleNPSA Alert
Naloxone 400 microgram x 5Accessible
Potassium chlorideAccessible

Formulation to be determined locally.

Potassium chloride concentrate solutions. Patient safety alert. The National Patient Safety Agency. July 2002.

Sodium bicarbonate 8.4% or 1.26%AccessibleVolume and concentration according to local policy

Other drugs (Adult)

Acute Hospital Care - Adult

Other drugs

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Adrenaline 1mg (1 ml 1:1000)ImmediateFirst-line treatment for anaphylaxis - 0.5 mg intramuscular injection in adults
Aspirin 300 mg and other antithrombotic agentsAccessibleFor acute coronary syndrome according to local policy
Furosemide 50 mg IV x 2Accessible
Flumazenil 0.5 mg IV x 2Accessible
Glucagon 1 mg IV x 1Accessible
GTN sprayAccessible
Ipratropium bromide 500 microgram nebules x 2 (and nebuliser device)Accessible
Salbutamol 5mg nebules x 2 (and nebuliser device) and IV preparation for infusionAccessible
0.9% sodium chloride or Hartmann’s solution 1000 ml x 2 cooled to 4°CAccessibleFor induction of therapeutic hypothermia as part of post-cardiorespiratory arrest care

Notes and supporting information (Adult)

Notes

  1. Portable monitoring and other equipment for patient transfer should be readily available.
  2. Further drugs for post-cardiac-arrest care (e.g. inotropes, vasopressors, anaesthetic agents, antibiotics) should be available readily, according to local critical care policies.
  3. Keeping resuscitation drugs locked away - this problem was addressed in detail in 2005 by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain in a revision of the Duthie Report (1988) ‘The Safe and Secure Handling of Medicines’. Resuscitation Council UK responded with a statement, along with an accompanying letter written to the CQC explaining the position.

Supporting information

  1. Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland (AAGBI) Safety Guideline - Interhospital Transfer. 2009. http://www.aagbi.org
  2. Intensive Care Society. Guidelines for the Transport of the Critically Ill Adult (3rd Edition 2011). http://www.ics.ac.uk
  3. The Hospital Management of Hypoglycaemia in Adults with Diabetes Mellitus https://www.diabetes.org.uk/Documents/About%20Us/Our%20views/Care%20recs/JBDS%20hypoglycaemia%20position%20(2013).pdf
(Video) Applying the Prioritization Framework Lecture for Junior Acute Care Nursing

Equipment and drug lists: paediatric

The equipment and drug lists in this chapter are for paediatric acute hospital care.

Drug tables for cardiac arrest are highlighted in the text with the symbol !

Airway and Breathing (Paediatric)

Acute Hospital Care - Paediatric

Airway and breathing

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Pocket mask with oxygen port - paediatric and adultImmediateAccording to local policy
Oxygen mask with reservoir - paediatric and adultImmediate
Self-inflating bag with reservoir - paediatric and adultImmediate
Clear face masks, size 00, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5Immediate
Oropharyngeal airways, sizes 00, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4Immediate
Nasopharyngeal airways, sizes 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.0, 7.0 (and lubrication)ImmediateUncuffed tracheal tubes of appropriate length may be used as an alternative according to local policy
Portable suction (battery or manual) with Yankauer sucker (paediatric and adult) and soft suction catheters, sizes 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14Immediate
Oxygen cylinder (with key if necessary)Immediate
Oxygen tubingImmediate
Magill forceps (adult and paediatric sizes)Immediate
StethoscopeImmediate
Supraglottic airway device with syringes, lubrication and ties/tapes/scissors as appropriateAccessibleChoice of device and size will depend on local policy and staff training
Tracheal tubes, uncuffed sizes 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 4.5, 5, 5.5, 6AccessibleCuffed paediatric tubes according to local policy
Tracheal tubes, cuffed sizes 6, 7, 8,Accessible
Croup tube (uncuffed, longer than standard tracheal tube), sizes 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5AccessibleAlternative devices may be substituted according to local policy (e.g. Cole's® tubes)
Tracheal tube introducer (stylet) small and mediumAccessible
Intubating bougie - 5 Ch & 10 ChAccessible
Laryngoscope handles (x 2) and blades (sizes -straight 0, 1, curved 2, 3, 4)
Spare batteries for laryngoscope and spare bulbs (if applicable)
Accessible
Syringes, lubrication and ties/tapes (e.g. Elastoplast® / Hypofix® /ribbon gauze/tape) and scissorsAccessible
Waveform capnograph - with appropriate tubing and connector (battery-operated)AccessibleNAP4 - 4th National Audit Project of the Royal College of Anaesthetists and the Difficult Airway Society, March 2011

Acute Hospital Care - Paediatric

Circulation

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Defibrillator
- Manual and/or automated external defibrillator (AED)
Immediate

Type of defibrillator and locations decided by a local risk assessment. AEDs are not intended for use in infants (less than 12 months old) and this should be considered at risk assessment

Availability of pacing function according to local policy

Adhesive defibrillator pads - paediatric and adult sizesImmediateSpare set of pads also recommended. Pads should be suitable for external pacing if needed
ECG electrodes (paediatric & adult sizes)Accessible
Intravenous cannulae (sizes 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24G) and 2% chlorhexidine / alcohol wipes, tourniquets and dressingsImmediate
Adhesive tapeImmediate
Intravenous infusion sets (with and without incorporated burette)Accessible
IV extension set with 3-way taps and bungsAccessible
0.9% sodium chloride¹AccessibleAmount depends on access to further fluids
10% Dextrose¹Accessible
Selection of needles and syringesImmediate
Intra-osseous access device with needles suitable for neonates, children and adultsImmediate
Colloid solution for IV infusion¹AccessibleAccording to local policy
Central venous access - Seldinger kit, full barrier precautions (hat, mask, sterile gloves, gown) and skin preparation (2% chlorhexidine / alcohol)ImmediateSizes and type according to local policy. Placed with ultrasound guidance, where possible
Ultrasound / echocardiographyImmediateTo identify and treat reversible causes of cardiorespiratory arrest

Other items (Paediatric)

Acute Hospital Care - Paediatric

Other items

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Clock / timerAccessible
Gloves, aprons, eye protectionImmediate
Urinary catheter, sizes 6-14Accessible
Nasogastric tube, sizes 6-14Accessible
Sharps container and clinical waste bagImmediateSharps container must be immediately available wherever sharps are used
Large scissorsAccessible
2% chlorhexidine / alcohol wipesAccessible
Blood sample tubesAccessible
Pressure bags for infusionAccessible
Blood gas syringeAccessible
Blood glucose monitor with appropriate stripsImmediate/Accessible
Drug labelsAccessibleGuidance on syringe labels
Manual handling equipmentAccessibleAccording to setting. See Guidance for safer handling during resuscitation in healthcare settings
Cardiorespiratory arrest record form for patient records and audit forms. DNACPR forms appropriate for children.Accessible
Access to algorithms, emergency drug doses, paediatric drug dose calculators (e.g. Broselow tape)ImmediateAccording to local policy

CARDIAC ARREST DRUGS - FIRST LINE for intravenous use ! (Paediatric)

Acute Hospital Care - Paediatric

CARDIAC ARREST DRUGS - FIRST LINE for intravenous use !

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Adrenaline 1mg (= 10 ml 1:10,000) prefilled syringe(s)¹ImmediateNumber of syringes depends on ease of access to further syringes if needed
Amiodarone 300mg prefilled syringe(s)¹Accessible
(Video) Medications New Emergency Nurses Must Know!

CARDIAC ARREST & PERI-ARREST DRUGS for intravenous use ! (Paediatric)

Acute Hospital Care - Paediatric

CARDIAC ARREST & PERI-ARREST DRUGS for intravenous use !

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Adenosine 6 mg¹Accessible
Atropine 1mg¹AccessibleALERT: Atropine is available in various concentrations
Adrenaline 1mg (= 10 ml 1:10,000)Accessible
Amiodarone 300mg¹Accessible
Calcium chloride 10 ml 10%¹AccessibleCalcium gluconate may be used as an alternative. Note:
10 ml 10% Calcium chloride = 6.8 mmol Ca2+
10 ml 10% Calcium gluconate = 2.26 mmol Ca2+
Chlorphenamine 10 mg¹AccessibleSecond-line treatment for anaphylaxis, can also give intramuscular
Diazepam and/or LorazepamAccessibleFor treatment of status epilepticus. Agent, dose and route of administration according to local policy
Hydrocortisone 100 mg¹AccessibleSecond-line treatment for anaphylaxis, can also be given intramuscularly
Glucose¹AccessibleConcentration according to local policy
20% Lipid emulsion¹AccessibleFor local anaesthetic toxicity
Lidocaine 100 mg¹Accessible
Magnesium sulfate (2 g = 8 mmol)¹Accessible
Midazolam 5 mg in 5 ml¹AccessibleNPSA Alert
Morphine¹AccessibleAccording to local policy
Naloxone 400 microgram¹Accessible
Potassium chloride¹AccessiblePotassium chloride concentrate solutions. Patient safety alert. The National Patient Safety Agency. July 2002.
Sodium bicarbonate 8.4% or 1.26%¹AccessibleConcentration and preparation according to local policy

OTHER EMERGENCY DRUGS (Paediatric)

Acute Hospital Care - Paediatric

OTHER EMERGENCY DRUGS

ItemSuggested availabilityComments
Adrenaline 1mg (1 ml 1:1000)¹ImmediateFirst-line treatment for anaphylaxis.
Can be part of an ‘anaphylaxis kit’ so that it is not mixed / confused with cardiorespiratory arrest drugs
Furosemide 50 mg IV¹Accessible
Flumazenil 0.5 mg IV¹Accessible
Glucagon 1 mg IV¹Accessible
Ipratropium bromide 500 microgram nebules (and nebuliser device)¹Accessible
Salbutamol 5mg nebules (and nebuliser device)¹Accessible
Salbutamol 1mg/ml for IV infusion¹Accessible

Notes (Paediatric)

  1. The volume and/or quantities of the listed fluids and drugs stored and their location should be determined by local policy. This should ensure that there is sufficient availability to manage a paediatric resuscitation according to Resuscitation Council UK resuscitation guidelines without undue delay.
  2. Portable monitoring and other equipment for patient transfer should be readily available.
  3. Further drugs for post-cardiac-arrest care (e.g. inotropes, vasopressors, anaesthetic agents, antibiotics) should be readily available according to local critical care policies.
  4. All interventions (e.g. drug therapy, practical procedures, discussions with other staff or relatives) should be documented with date and time and signed by an identifiable member of staff.
  5. Keeping resuscitation drugs locked away - this problem was addressed in detail in 2005 by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain in a revision of the Duthie Report (1988) ‘The Safe and Secure Handling of Medicines’. Resuscitation Council UK responded with a statement, along with an accompanying letter written to the CQC explaining the position.

FAQs

Which of the following items of resuscitation equipment should be available in every primary care practice? ›

Every healthcare practice should be equipped with an automated external defibrillator (AED) and appropriate arrangements should exist to ensure that it is readily available in the surgery whenever it may be required.

What equipment is needed for resuscitation? ›

Resuscitation equipment contents include: two adult exhaled air resuscitation masks, two child exhaled air resuscitation masks, four pairs disposable gloves. Discard mask and gloves after one use. Replace equipment as indicated.

What should be on a crash trolley? ›

  1. airways. and.
  2. lubrication. Oral.
  3. airways. Bag valve.
  4. mask. (includes.
  5. size 5 mask) Suction.
  6. catheters. Oxygen mask.
  7. (reservoir) Tuff cut.
  8. scissors. Skin prep.

How often should you check Resus trolley? ›

The local hospital policy for these wards was that all adult resuscitation trolleys must be checked at the beginning of each nursing shift and the paediatric trolley must be checked every 24 hours.

Do you give adrenaline after every shock? ›

Vasopressor drugs

Give adrenaline 1 mg IV (IO) after the 3rd shock for adult patients in cardiac arrest with a shockable rhythm. Repeat adrenaline 1 mg IV (IO) every 3-5 minutes whilst ALS continues.

What drugs are used in resuscitation? ›

In a patient without IV or intraosseous (IO) access, naloxone, atropine, and epinephrine, when indicated, may be given via the endotracheal tube at 2 to 2.5 times the IV dose. During administration of a drug via endotracheal tube, compression should be briefly stopped.

What machine is used for CPR? ›

The LUCAS device is an easy-to-use mechanical chest compression device that helps lifesaving teams around the world deliver high-quality, guidelines-consistent chest compressions to sudden cardiac arrest patients; in the field, on the move and in the hospital.

WHAT ARE THE ABCs OF CPR? ›

cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures

may be summarized as the ABCs of CPR—A referring to airway, B to breathing, and C to circulation.

Can you shock asystole? ›

Asystole is a non-shockable rhythm. Therefore, if asystole is noted on the cardiac monitor, no attempt at defibrillation should be made. High-quality CPR should be continued with minimal (less than five seconds) interruption.

What are the cardiac emergency drugs? ›

Drugs for acute coronary syndrome
  • M: morphine.
  • O: oxygen.
  • N: nitroglycerin.
  • A: aspirin.
11 Jul 2010

How many crash carts should a hospital have? ›

You need to ensure that there is at least one crash cart available at all times in every emergency room where it is most needed.

What is resuscitation kit? ›

The Emergency Resuscitation Kit is designed to provide IPPV and continuous oxygen inhalation therapy in an emergency. The kit consists of an automatic ventilator, manual resuscitator, manual suction apparatus, a small oxygen cylinder apart from the other diagnostic and surgical items.

Which can be included as the cardiac resuscitation equipment in ICU from the following? ›

The ICU equipment we offer include Defibrillator, Patient Monitor, Ventilator, CPAP & BPAP systems etc.
  • Ventilator. We are manufacturer & supplier of Ventilator... ...
  • CPAP System. NET brand CPAP System are high quality... ...
  • BPAP System. ...
  • Patient Monitor. ...
  • Infusion Pump. ...
  • Syringe Pump. ...
  • Blood Warmer. ...
  • Defibrillator.

What is a resuscitation tray? ›

Resuscitation Trolley is a combination of drawers/trays/shelves that are on wheels and used in hospitals as transportation and dispensing of emergency equipment/medication at the site of some surgical/medical emergency for life support situations.

When using an AED you need to? ›

How to Use An AED
  1. Remove all clothing covering the chest. If necessary, wipe the chest dry.
  2. Place one pad on the upper right side of the chest.
  3. Place the other pad on the lower left side of the chest, a few inches below the left armpit.

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